Catholic Resources

UnApologetic Catholic Sites

  • Pat Mulcahey's Caritas Christi Urget Nos
    a Deacon discerns the priesthood and shares his journey with us. God bless him! May Christ's love impel us all to answer His Call.
  • Cafeteria Catholic
    Demostrating yet again that the Catholic Cafeteria is as spiritually filling as the othodox deli.
  • Bad Catholic
    A "Bad in Name Only" Catholic voices strong opinions
  • Dappled Things
    Priests are busy. Thankfully, some blog, unapologetically
  • Disputations
    Criticial thinking of the highest order from a Venn Master, demonstrating that reason is the most effective apologetics
  • Journey to Vatican III
    Rebecca Nappi, Theologian and Newpaper Columnist with rare insights
  • Flos Carmeli
    Discussions in a Carmelite Tradition
  • The Lesser of Two Weevils
    A zen Catholic studying Hebrew and finding God in quantum physics is sure to have interesting things to say!
  • Built on a Rock
    Commentary on ecumenical issues is unsurpassed.
  • Noli Irritare Leones
    Yet another thoughtful calm commentary on religion, Catholics, politics and the world written by a non-Catholic.
  • Catholic Sensibility
    A "peace"ful website by a sensible Catholic liturgist usually avoiding the Catholic blog fratricide
  • Real Live Preacher
    OK, OK, He's not even Catholic--But he's a model for the unapologetic Christian who evangelizes with the lure of a Cristian life well lived and observed, not the hammer of screaming apologetics hellfire and brimstone.
  • Open Book
    Most unapologetic site by a true apologetic Catholic in the best sense of the word
  • Catholicism, Spirituality and Holiness
    Thoughtful Catholic man combines family, career and faith.

Noteworthy Catholic and Religious Blogs

  • A Cautious Man
    Pointing out that we could all be a little more cautious in forming our instant internet opinions. Heed his advice.
  • Beanbag Central
    Capital "C" equals Catholic Chaos at aptly named site.
  • Catholic and Enjoying It!
    Intentionally apologetic, can be over the top outrageous, provocative, but freqently informative, thoughtful and spirtitual
  • Fath Based Politiics
    Politics informed by faith--backwards from the usual. Maybe two ii's are better after all.
  • Musings of An Ordinary Catholic
    Not so ordinary musings
  • Ragamuffin Ramblings
    Words of wisdom from the Windy City
  • Sancta Sanctis
    You cannot miss Chesterton Thursdays! Comprehensive list of Catholic websites and a beatiful site that lives up to its name.
  • St. Blog's Parish Hall
    Graciously maintained by a holy person, whose virtue must be patience, a lengthy list of Catholic blogs, both apologetic and unapologetic.
  • The Squire
    Running from the thought police, and he's got a long way to go.
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Comments

Shakie G

I don't think celibacy is the problem. I think the problem has been this idea that the priesthood is the 'best' vocation, the 'holy' vocation. This attitude draws the wrong sort of people to it, and too often in the past we've shuffled these people through the seminary because we beliebved it too. The young priests I know today have overcome this, and the attack on the family today is something that is waking up married people to the necessity and sacredness of their vocations. Healthy families will breed healthy priests in a way that nothing else will.

Shakie G

I don't think celibacy is the problem. I think the problem has been this idea that the priesthood is the 'best' vocation, the 'holy' vocation. This attitude draws the wrong sort of people to it, and too often in the past we've shuffled these people through the seminary because we believed it too. The young priests I know today have overcome this, and the attack on the family today is something that is waking up married people to the necessity and sacredness of their vocations. Healthy families will breed healthy priests in a way that nothing else will.

Steve Bogner

I think mandatory celibacy needs to be eliminated, but that's independent of the sexual abuse issue, in my mind. It's an issue of justice and compassion.

There are many heterosexual married men who are sexual abusers.

For me, the big problem here is that good governance from a hierarchy requires members of that hierarchy who are not afraid to speak out against injustice. It's all too easy for a hierarchy to brush things under the rug - it's a self-preserving command and control mechanism. It's human nature. And it's not working.

Fred K

St. Ignatius, at least with regard to his own order, suggested that one's calling was to follow Christ completely in the consecrated life; those who came attached to the priesthood were not suitable. To me, that suggests that the desire for power and office instead of service is a large part of the problem. Thus, many feel "called" to exercising power or influence over children or other parishoners . . .

One question: the Catholic Church is a fairly decentralized, feudal, federalist type system. Would increased centralization solve the problems of sexual abuse of children by priests? Could such centralization cause other difficulties?

Fred

Unapologetic Catholic

Thanks, Steve Fred and Shakie. I don't mean to suggest that married hetersexual priests will not sexually abuse children or even that celibacy should be optional. In my own clumsy way, it appears tha the chruch ahs made not much of an institutional effort to prevent or deal with any form of celibacy violation.

Should it do so? I think so. Is the organization correct (governance and centralization raised by comments)? I don't think so.

I think there has to be a way around the chain of command, an ombudsman or some way to circumvent a command and control system that is toxic.

Todd

Peace, UC.

I think your mythbusting points are spot on. I do agree with those who have said that celibacy is an important issue, but not as closely related to sexual abuse as some might think.

One point I'd add: for clergy who choose celibacy (be they whatever fraction of the priesthood) some means of living the lifestyle with adequate support needs to be put into place. Lonely priests are vulnerable to alcoholism, and other addictions, as well as self-justification for seeking out sexual gratification. Celibacy shouldn't have to be an exercise in heroism; God knows there are more than enough challenges for a parish priest these days without piling on burdens.

John

The latest on Monsignor Dale Fushek and the Life Teen teen scream.

http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/issues/2005-02-24/news/feature.html

No one asked me but perhaps any male supporter of father Dale Fushek should have to testify that they have never been in the rectory hot tub with him and they do not have FD or MD written upside down on any of their belongings. Scary .. What's next upside down crosses?

Bebaios

The conclusion is illogical: that celibacy is the problem. Sexual abuse derives from lust, and lust is not celibacy. Most of your commentor say the only reason celibacy should be eliminated because "I think so," "I say so." Yet the condemn the attitude of superiority in some imaginary ideal past, which we have now overcome in liberated enlightenment. I suppose that same enlightened mind determined that only a small fraction of priests "choose" celibacy. Look, guys, all's I'm asking for is something that has even a semblance of intellectual rigor, wisdom of life, and faith of the Church (not either/or, but both/and). Begin with the premise that Jesus Christ is the son of God, a celibate, no more exposed to alcoholism than a priest who shares his priesthood. Go and learn what it is that the Church is the bride of Christ, and tighten up the rigor of your logic.

Talmida

Bebaois, Jesus may well have been celibate, however there is zero evidence to support the assertion. Jesus did not demand celibacy. Jesus' apostles were not celibate. When Paul preached celibacy, he did not hold up Our Lord as the example to follow.

Celibacy was not an entrenched part of the priesthood until the end of the first millenium.

If Jesus does not ask it, why should Rome?

I agree with you that some intellectual rigour would be nice -- far too many commentors idealize the past of the Church as it was immediately prior to Vatican II; I much prefer the past as Jesus taught us to live it in the Gospels.


Unapologetic Catholic

I don't know if celibacy is a problem of not. All things being equal I'd favor it. The point I was making is that part of the problem is lack of observance of celibacy. If it's really not being observed at the levels that are indicated by research, then it is a fraud to advertise priests as "celibate" and it needlessly endangers the laity. I agree 100% that sexual abuse is casued by lust. How many priests can restain themselves from the sin of lust? What level of compliance with celibcay is considered accpetable by the Church? 100%, 95%, 40%?

I really don't know the answers. I just don't thinkthe Churhc is trying very hard to really address this issue in a logical manner

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